Ingredient Spotlight: Native Kakadu Plum

Native to Australia's Northern Territory, the Kakadu Plum has been used for centuries by the native aboriginal people as food and medicine. Traditionally, the fruit as well as the seeds were eaten raw and the bark was boiled and used to treat various skin conditions. The native aboriginal people long knew about the benefits of the super fruit. Kakadu Plum has the highest level of natural Vitamin C in the world, making it very valuable. 

Kakadu Plum is a small olive-green coloured fruit that has a slightly bitter flavour. It grows wild in the Northern Territory and Western Australia and is primarily wild harvested. Since the plant is harvested in the wild many natural factors impact the amount of fruit that is available in any given season. There are also important factors that need to be taken into consideration when harvesting the plums. Studies have shown that when grown and harvested according to traditional methods, the plums are better quality and maintain the health benefits.

The fruit's use in the skincare industry has been growing in recent years, making it a powerful ingredient in skincare formulations. Currently, Kakadu Plum is in undersupply and there have been enquiries from big international enterprises wanting to grow commercial amounts of this fruit for other markets. However, this would mean it could have a negative effect on the local native community that is involved in the growing and harvesting of the plants. Knowing where the ingredients for your skincare products come from is so important, especially when it can be supporting small communities and traditional methods of growing and harvesting plants.

Australian super fruit

BENEFITS & USES

Let's have a look at what makes Kakadu Plum so good for your skin.

Very high amount of Vitamin C

Kakadu Plums contain over 3000mg of Vitamin C per 100g of fruits compared to around only 50mg/100g in oranges. The high concentration of Vitamin C makes the fruit very effective at improving the skin's appearance. It helps reduce the appearance of scars and blemishes, while stimulating collagen production, which helps reduce fine lines and wrinkles. 

The high concentration of Vitamin C also helps reduce the appearance of hyper-pigmentation, leaving the skin even-toned.  

High in anti-oxidants

Wild harvested plants are naturally higher in anti-oxidants, because they grow free from human interference and need to develop efficient defence mechanism to ensure healthy growth. Kakadu Plum grows wild in the harsh climate of remote Australia, which makes them very rich in anti-oxidants. 

Anti-oxidants are needed to fight free radicals (e.g. pollution, sun) and help protect the skin from damage. Rich in anti-oxidants the Australian super fruit is perfect for helping to keep the skin protected from environmental damage. 

Balancing for skin conditions

Kakadu Plum is antibacterial as well as anti-inflammatory, this makes the fruit ideal for both, sensitive as well as blemished, acne-prone skin. It helps balance the skin's ph level and restore the natural protective barrier of the skin. 

High in gallic acid, Kakadu Plums help reduce inflammation, soothe irritated skin as well as reduce redness.

 

As you can see this native super fruit is a great ingredient to incorporate into your daily skincare ritual. The fruit is balancing for all skin types and helps bring the skin back to it's healthy place. 

The Kakaku Plum's used in the Wildcrafted Organics range we carry support small aboriginal communities here in Australia and are processed in a manner that allows the fruits to keep their high content of vitamins.

The powder used in the skincare products by Wildcrafted Organics are Gubinge, which is from the Dampier Peninsula, north of Broome. The grower Bruno Dann (Winnawal) uses traditional methods to grow and harvest the fruit within his community. 

I have listed the products from our collection below that include this wonderful super fruit - enjoy discovering, Mermaids! 🐚

Sources

[Online]. https://www.agrifutures.com.au/wp-content/uploads/publications/14-115.pdf

[Online]. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.464.9926&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Image credit @wheydirect